The sweet tooth kids

Map of the translations of "Hansel und Gretel" in other European languages
The kids who tried to eat a whole house

The tiny boy

Map of the translations of "Tom Thumb" in other European languages
As small as a thumb, a toe, a bean, or a chickpea

The red girl

Map of the translations of "Little Red Riding Hood" in other European languages
She wore a cape, maybe a hoodie, some type of hat, or cap.

The ashen girl

Map of the translations of "Cendrillon" or Cinderella in other European languages
Ashes, cinders, embers, and soot

Probably one of the most famous stories ever told, Cinderella got her nickname from her evil step-sisters. In most languages, it is derived from the word ash (or some synonym like cinder or ember). In Portuguese, Persian, Hebrew, Arabic, and Maltese the English word is adapted to phonetics. The case of Azerbaijani is very interesting: Küllücə, is the local name, Zoluşka comes from Russian and Sindirella, from English. However, in some other languages, the name is very different but still connected somehow. In Catalan, among other names, the most famous is ventafocs (literally fan-fire, is a fire fan or a maid ), in Wallon, Cropecinde (an andiron or firedog, metal support for logs) and in Polish, Kopciuszek, comes from kopeć (soot, the black powder from burning).

A glass slipper?

This object used to identify the heroine is different in each version: anklet, a ring, a bracelet. The most memorable is the glass slipper, which appears in Perrault’s tale as “pantoufle de verre” (slipper of glass). However, some scholars have argued that it might have been confused with pantoufle de vair (slipper of squirrel fur). Oh là là! Anyways the story would lose the intensity of Cinderella’s shoe breaking and losing any possibility of being recognized.

Recommended Articles

2 Comments

  1. Another name for the character in Portuguese is “Gata Borralheira” (gata=cat; borralheira= associated to borralho=ember)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.